40% of Execs Surf Porn at Work (and spotting spies, RMS/Bitcoin, Snowden, Omidyar/Greewald)

QOTD: “It’s not the words, but the story the words are telling you.” — Robert Kiyosaki

And when someone tells a story, it’s not about the story, but about what the story says about them. Understanding this principle of meta-levels is key to people-reading (and people-fooling). Higher level human-security games are played almost exclusively on meta-levels of meaning — it makes keeping secrets far easier.

Master this meta-understanding and you’ll find yourself spotting spies and informants and “agents of influence” with astonishing ease.

(Just watch out, there’s an odd feature of human psychology that fucks this up sometimes. If you strongly believe someone is on one or the other side of the fence, both their meta-level actions and your analysis sometimes sway to confirm your beliefs, whether your beliefs are right or wrong.)

Anyway, another side of human nature — 40% of “malware analysts” have cleared porn-surfing-caused malware from senior executives’ work computers. In other words, 40% of senior executives surf so much porn they get pwned in the process.

(By comparison, 56% of malware analysts had cleared malware that came from phishing emails.)

RMS makes an excellent point. Bitcoin, right now, is not good enough. We need anonymity in the currency. http://rt.com/news/bitcoin-not-anonymous-stallman-522/

Snowden was a “certified ethical hacker.” http://www.zdnet.com/in/snowden-picked-up-hacking-skills-in-india-7000023909/

The Omidyar/Greenwald/etc venture is dedicating itself to gonzo journalism. Please, get one of their employees to show up to a press conference with a floppy hat, cigarette holder, and sunglasses. http://www.theatlantic.com/politics/archive/2013/12/a-news-organization-that-rejects-the-view-from-nowhere/281979/

http://www.ibtimes.com/malware-study-porn-viruses-found-40-percent-senior-executives-computers-1471406

“ThreatTrack Security, a cybersecurity firm based in Clearwater, Fla., published a study that analyzed the origins of malware infection on corporate computer networks. The ThreatTrack study found that 40 percent of malware analysts have removed malware that originated from a senior executive visiting a pornographic website.[…]

The No. 1 cause was from analysts clicking on malicious links in phishing emails. This may not be surprising, as these types of attacks are believed to be the cause of a number of high-profile hacks, such as one that shut down the New York Times’ website.”

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