Snowden Speaks (and loads of random stuff: Crypto, Lifehacking/Sleep, Peak Oil, LavaBit, SecureDrop, NSA, Omidyar, Pentagon Papers)

Snowden believes there’s no chance the Chinese or Russians have his docs; he deleted his copy before leaving China. Nor has he collaborated with the intelligence agencies of either country. In his words, had he done so the NSA would have “set the table on fire” yelling that he’d made their operations in China go dark — he had access to all of them.

(I doubt this. Compartmentalization means it’s almost certainly not true. But, Snowden IS known for being a bit cocky.)

Also, the impact of SnowdenLeaks was “bigger than he had anticipated.”

John Young railed against his always-on-message style in the interview, but I understand it… when opponents are looking for the slightest possible PR weakness, you do everything you can to minimize attack surface. I’m guessing this is also why the “Sam Adams Award” videos were more silent than otherwise.

Going by SnowdenLeaks (or Snowden’s knowledge) will *NOT GIVE YOU ANY USEFUL INFORMATION ABOUT WHAT CRYPTO THE NSA CAN OR CANNOT BREAK* —
I’ve pointed this out before but ForeignPolicy drives it home. Note you can safely assume everything else in the article is the most elegant form of disinformation… as John Young noted, “Seems a fair number of anonymizees duped the author of the article.”

I think it was Appelbaum (at a speech before the US Embassy Berlin) that claimed “crypto works” because he used it to talk with Snowden before the Leaks… considering the US intelligence community was spending their entire counter-intel budget trying to identify Snowden at the time… http://www.foreignpolicy.com/articles/2013/10/15/the_nsa_s_new_codebreakers?page=0,0

Polyphasic sleep is the *norm* in hunter gatherer societies… hmm, maybe I’ll have to give it another go. http://discovermagazine.com/2007/dec/sleeping-like-a-hunter-gatherer

Sleep is a dishwasher for your brain:
http://news.sciencemag.org/brain-behavior/2013/10/sleep-ultimate-brainwasher http://www.sciencemag.org/content/342/6156/373

Peak Oil has been cancelled… what does that do for the Club of Rome / “coming resource wars” line of apocalyptic thinking? We all die of global warming instead of running out of energy? (use robo-translate if you can’t read German.)
http://www.weser-kurier.de/startseite_artikel,-Oel-und-Gas-reichen-laenger-_arid,685874.html

If you used LavaBit, their “get your data” effort may be a honeypot:
http://www.reddit.com/r/privacy/comments/1okv6c/fbinsa_have_set_up_a_honeypot_for_getting_lavabit/cct9k58

SecureDrop goes online… oddly enough this has been tried before —
the first time, it was called OpenLeaks and run by ex-Wikileaker, Bank of America document-dump-deleter, and now prominent German Pirate Party leadership figure Daniel Domscheit-Berg. https://pressfreedomfoundation.org/securedrop

The NSA sees drug smugglers as a target too. Maybe don’t buy drugs with Bitcoin. http://www.emptywheel.net/2013/10/17/why-did-nsa-raise-traffickers-for-story-about-drone-killing-terrorists/

Background on Pierre Omidyar’s philanthropy — lots of microfunding, and his foundation pushed Couchsurfing.org into a for-profit model. No doubt we’ll much more scrutiny of the man in the near future. http://tomslee.net/2013/09/six-degrees-of-omidyar.html

Not all the Pentagon Papers were ever released, some were held back and have never made it to the public eye. http://cryptome.org/2013/10/nyt-nsa-papers.htm

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/10/18/world/snowden-says-he-took-no-secret-files-to-russia.html

” Mr. Snowden said he gave all of the classified documents he had obtained to journalists he met in Hong Kong, before flying to Moscow, and did not keep any copies for himself. He did not take the files to Russia “because it wouldn’t serve the public interest,” he said.

“What would be the unique value of personally carrying another copy of the materials onward?” he added.

He also asserted that he was able to protect the documents from China’s spies because he was familiar with that nation’s intelligence abilities, saying that as an N.S.A. contractor he had targeted Chinese operations and had taught a course on Chinese cybercounterintelligence.

“There’s a zero percent chance the Russians or Chinese have received any documents,” he said. […]

Mr. Snowden said he had never considered defecting while in Hong Kong, nor in Russia, where he has been permitted to stay for one year. He said he felt confident that he had kept the documents secure from Chinese spies, and that the N.S.A. knew he had done so. His last target while working as an agency contractor was China, he said, adding that he had had “access to every target, every active operation” mounted by the N.S.A. against the Chinese. “Full lists of them,” he said.

“If that was compromised,” he went on, “N.S.A. would have set the table on fire from slamming it so many times in denouncing the damage it had caused. Yet N.S.A. has not offered a single example of damage from the leaks. They haven’t said boo about it except ‘we think,’ ‘maybe,’ ‘have to assume’ from anonymous and former officials. Not ‘China is going dark.’ Not ‘the Chinese military has shut us out.’ ” […]

He disputed an account in The New York Times last week reporting that a derogatory comment placed in his personnel evaluation while he was in Geneva was a result of suspicions that he was trying to break in to classified files to which he was not authorized to have access. (The C.I.A. later took issue with the description of why he had been reprimanded.) Mr. Snowden said the comment was placed in his file by a senior manager seeking to punish him for trying to warn the C.I.A. about a computer vulnerability. […]

Mr. Snowden said that the impact of his decision to disclose information about the N.S.A. had been bigger than he had anticipated. He added that he did not control what the journalists who had the documents wrote about. He said that he handed over the documents to them because he wanted his own bias “divorced from the decision-making of publication,” and that “technical solutions were in place to ensure the work of the journalists couldn’t be interfered with.”

Mr. Snowden declined to provide details about his living conditions in Moscow, except to say that he was not under Russian government control and was free to move around. “

Advertisements
%d bloggers like this: